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Author Topic: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)  (Read 4376 times)

Offline Houmack

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Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« on: August 27, 2013, 06:46:55 PM »
After searching high and low, I came across the method described below which i found to be the best. This might be of good value to those looking for instructions on how to bleed their clutch on the T56.

the JMD method:

Use a 90 degree spark plug boot.
At the plug wire boot opening, insert hose that fits snugly and is airtight.
Open the bleeder just enough that fluid can come out.
Place the spark plug side of the boot over the bleeder.
Set the the loose end of the hose into a bottle.
Keep the reservoir full while some fluid drains from the hose.
Once you've replaced some fluid, remove the loose end of the hose from the bottle.
Place the loose end of the hose into the clutch fluid reservoir so its end is pointed down and submerged in fluid.
Use a clip or wire or have a helper to hold it in place.
Pump the pedal a few minutes.
This forces fluid through the entire system and the air has a chance to escape by bubbling out at the reservoir.

**the Mityvac pull from the reservoir method cannot pull all air out from the slave as the hose connect to the slave below the top of the top fluid level This method can, since the bleeder is at the top of the fluid in the slave.**


Offline digitalsolo

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2013, 08:52:20 PM »
**the Mityvac pull from the reservoir method cannot pull all air out from the slave as the hose connect to the slave below the top of the top fluid level This method can, since the bleeder is at the top of the fluid in the slave.**

The ~15-20 T56s I've bled would thoroughly disagree with that statement.  ;)

The procedure you're describing above sounds like a bench bleed, unless you're talking about using a remote bleeder.
Blake MF'ing McBride
1988 Mazda RX7 - Turbo LS1/T56/ProEFI/8.8/Not Slow...   sold.
1965 Mustang Coupe - TT Coyote, TR6060, modern brakes/suspension...  project car
2013 Focus ST3 - Stage 1 BPU

Offline Houmack

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2013, 10:10:07 PM »
how do you do your mityvac bleeding? can you please describe?

yes, it's like a bench bleed but while the everything is on the car and no need for a remote bleeder. The line you create plugged into the spark plug boot acts as just that.

Offline stangslayer

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2013, 12:06:18 PM »
The line you are using must be at least 6-8 feet in length for this to work, correct?
After the line is full of fluid, you leave the bleeder cracked open while you pump the pedal? wont the fluid and air just go back and forth from one location as the pedal goes down and back again as the pedal goes up?
406sbc, T56, home made solid 8.8
11.85@120.3 (motor)
hoping for high 10's on 150 shot

Offline digitalsolo

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2013, 01:07:06 PM »
how do you do your mityvac bleeding? can you please describe?

yes, it's like a bench bleed but while the everything is on the car and no need for a remote bleeder. The line you create plugged into the spark plug boot acts as just that.


I think I've posted this one a few times, but sure.

I use a Mityvac with the big flat attachment (the one that looks like the end of a plunger in this picture):



I drop that whole shebang into the master cylinder and suck up a couple pumps worth of fluid to fill the lines (so I don't push air when I release pressure) and then push it down so that it seals to top of the bore that the reservoir seals to.  I this picture you can see where the clamp secures the reservoir.   This the bore that sticks up that you seal the Mityvac against.  Obviously you do this with the reservoir installed and full of fluid:



I then pump the Mityvac up to about 15" of vacuum and let it sit for 10-15 minutes.   Then bleed it off slowly (don't let it push air back into the hose).   Remove it from the master and pump the pedal a few times, then repeat as necessary.   I generally complete it in 2-3 cycles.   This takes maybe 30-45 minutes to complete, but is only like 2 minutes of actual work (unless you really want to stare at it while it sits and draws vacuum).   

I have done upwards of 20 systems on FCs and FDs this way and it works 100% of the time.   Rock hard pedal on every single one of them and I've never had any of them with all of the random "my T56 won't shift at WOT" issues.   Careful routing of the hose away from exhaust helps this also.   This method won't work if you have the clutch master tied off of the brake master, but I think that's a bad idea.
Blake MF'ing McBride
1988 Mazda RX7 - Turbo LS1/T56/ProEFI/8.8/Not Slow...   sold.
1965 Mustang Coupe - TT Coyote, TR6060, modern brakes/suspension...  project car
2013 Focus ST3 - Stage 1 BPU

Offline halfspec

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2013, 08:58:39 AM »
Blake

I have a question about your method. In your opinion, is there any need for a remote bleeder if you use the method you've described here? I only ask because I have a 6ft remote bleeder I'm on the fence about reinstalling when my new rebuilt trans comes back. It's loooong and I usually just wrap it around the shifter area after I bleed the SC. However, if I don't need it, the install would look cleaner.

Any thoughts?

Lane

Offline largeorangefont

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2013, 10:31:34 AM »
After reading all the horror stories about this I was a little was worried about bleeding the clutch. The whole system was dry, and with 2 guys and a mityvac it was done in 10 mins. I filled it up, hooked the mityvac to the bleeder on the master, and put a little vaccum on it and got fluid in the mityvac line. Tightened the bleeder, pumped the pedal and did it again for good measure.

Then hooked the mityvac to my remote bleeder on the slave and did the same process. After 3 rounds of pumping up the pedal, openin the bleeder and pumping the pedal back up, it was good.

I have a short 8 inch bleeder line on my trans. I just made a small bracket to tie the bleeder line next to the trans so I could get to it. It is easy to get to under the car, but keeps things clean under hood.

I used the Speedway Motors t56 bleeder kit with the 8 inch line. I also used their brake line hardware to retain the line, I just made a bracket that bolts to the transmission, and attached the speedway brake line bracket to it.

http://www.speedwaymotors.com/T56-Release-Bearing-Remote-Bleeder,41385.html

Ronin Speedworks Test Mule

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Offline digitalsolo

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2013, 10:32:55 AM »
Blake

I have a question about your method. In your opinion, is there any need for a remote bleeder if you use the method you've described here? I only ask because I have a 6ft remote bleeder I'm on the fence about reinstalling when my new rebuilt trans comes back. It's loooong and I usually just wrap it around the shifter area after I bleed the SC. However, if I don't need it, the install would look cleaner.

Any thoughts?

Lane

Lane,

The bleeder makes it take LONGER to bleed it my way.   I sold my bleeder long ago, never needed it.

-Blake
Blake MF'ing McBride
1988 Mazda RX7 - Turbo LS1/T56/ProEFI/8.8/Not Slow...   sold.
1965 Mustang Coupe - TT Coyote, TR6060, modern brakes/suspension...  project car
2013 Focus ST3 - Stage 1 BPU

Offline largeorangefont

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2013, 10:38:03 AM »
Blake,

Are there any visual cues to know when your way is complete? More fluid in the mityvac or something?

Ronin Speedworks Test Mule

Quote from: cool
Sell it to spacevomit.  He'll finish it.

Offline digitalsolo

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #9 on: September 23, 2013, 11:14:56 AM »
It will stop pulling air out of the master when it's done.    I usually just go by pedal feel though.
Blake MF'ing McBride
1988 Mazda RX7 - Turbo LS1/T56/ProEFI/8.8/Not Slow...   sold.
1965 Mustang Coupe - TT Coyote, TR6060, modern brakes/suspension...  project car
2013 Focus ST3 - Stage 1 BPU

Offline largeorangefont

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #10 on: September 23, 2013, 12:51:37 PM »
Gotcha.. I am going to try it your way next time.

Ronin Speedworks Test Mule

Quote from: cool
Sell it to spacevomit.  He'll finish it.

Offline halfspec

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #11 on: September 23, 2013, 02:26:05 PM »
Lane,

The bleeder makes it take LONGER to bleed it my way.   I sold my bleeder long ago, never needed it.

-Blake

Sounds right to me. I didn't think about the remote line asking as a reservoir for fluid! I'll ditch it for sure :)

One last question. At the end of each cycle you say to "bleed it off slowly." How are you accomplishing this? My mighty vac only has a release trigger and it isn't exactly a precision device ;)
I was thinking one way to do it would be to slowly pry the flat / plunger attachment away from the MC bore so that fluid inside the MC reservoir is sucked into the vacuum of the mightyvac which would effectively equalize the pressure while everything is completely submerged.  I'm interested in what you do though.

Lane


Offline digitalsolo

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #12 on: September 23, 2013, 02:31:33 PM »
I just "bump" the release a little at a time as opposed to just flat out releasing it.   Then I pull the hose up to "pop" it off the master like you are suggesting.   :)

-Blake
Blake MF'ing McBride
1988 Mazda RX7 - Turbo LS1/T56/ProEFI/8.8/Not Slow...   sold.
1965 Mustang Coupe - TT Coyote, TR6060, modern brakes/suspension...  project car
2013 Focus ST3 - Stage 1 BPU

Offline halfspec

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #13 on: September 23, 2013, 05:13:46 PM »
I just "bump" the release a little at a time as opposed to just flat out releasing it.   Then I pull the hose up to "pop" it off the master like you are suggesting.   :)

-Blake

Thank you!

Last question. Sorry, I'm hoping to install my trans next weekend and I don't want to mess up and have to do it again.

I've got a brand new slave I'm installing with my rebuilt trans. While it should be 100% I'd hate to install the trans and find out its a dud. Does anyone see any problem with me installing the clutch line and bleeding everything while the trans is on the ground (pending I have the length). This way I could verify that the SC actuates and doesn't leak or anything before I actually mount the trans. Or is that a bad idea?

Lane


Offline digitalsolo

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Re: Bleeding the Clutch (Might be a good stickey)
« Reply #14 on: September 23, 2013, 05:44:02 PM »
No bueno, you will overextend the slave.    You need something to limit the travel.
Blake MF'ing McBride
1988 Mazda RX7 - Turbo LS1/T56/ProEFI/8.8/Not Slow...   sold.
1965 Mustang Coupe - TT Coyote, TR6060, modern brakes/suspension...  project car
2013 Focus ST3 - Stage 1 BPU

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