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Author Topic: Welding tips...  (Read 2929 times)

Offline 383mazda

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Re: Welding tips...
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2011, 10:00:04 PM »
tac things in place before you do a full weld
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Offline WannaBeFast

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Re: Welding tips...
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2011, 10:24:21 PM »
Take a welding class.  ~$60 on average at your local community college. Do it do it.

Offline 65imp

Re: Welding tips...
« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2011, 01:45:09 PM »
I'm barely decent with my MIG, and it is a little 120 unit.  But here are a couple things I have noticed:

-If you don't need to weld a full seam for strength or sealing, don't do it. 

-trial fit before you weld, then after you tack it in place.  Then try to brace the piece before full welding, or you can warp it pretty easily. 

-If in doubt about why it is not welding nicely, turn up the power. Maybe this is true for just little welders like mine, but it frequently solves many issues. 

-If welding sheet, or really thin stuff it is sometime worthwhile to do several little spot type welds and overlap.  only do a couple at a time, then let that area cool. 
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Offline Bigblockquad

Re: Welding tips...
« Reply #18 on: March 05, 2011, 06:53:34 PM »
How about schools for welding?  I'm a visual learner.  Gotta do it to remember.  Reading about it is almost worthless for me to retain anything.  Anyone her in NorCal have any recommendations?

BTW, my local JC has an 80 person deep wait list so that's out.
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Offline FabChild

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Re: Welding tips...
« Reply #19 on: March 05, 2011, 10:35:40 PM »
You need to hop on that wait list and be #81.  You don't want to pay out the ass somewhere learning to weld. There is a place by me that charges $800 for two 8 hours sessions on the weekend.  I spend $96 a class at my CC and get 5 1/2 hours a week for 3 1/2 months. Much better deal plus it's a great education.
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Offline V8-rx7

Re: Welding tips...
« Reply #20 on: March 05, 2011, 11:52:21 PM »
Buy a welder and start welding or just pay someone to weld your shit.
I found tge videos done by Jody at Weldingtipsandtricks to be really helpful when i started welding. Check them out on youtube.
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Offline FabChild

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Re: Welding tips...
« Reply #21 on: March 06, 2011, 12:26:13 AM »
I'll give some Tig welding tips some of this stuff may have been covered but that's ok lol. I go to Riverside Community College for an A.S in Welding Technology i'm about 3/4 the way done. I also work as a student instructor for the Tig Welding class in the morning which is pretty cool. I get paid to hold 2 additional lab sessions and 1 lecture session every week. Helping people learn Tig has upped my knowledge tremendously.  I started Tig Welding a little over a year ago and I usually spend about 12-15 hrs a week doing Tig and have been improving everyday. I'm not a pro just yet but I consider myself pretty decent.

1) Always remember to spend the time to prep your metal. This is the key with Tig because the process doesn't really have any cleaning effect unless your welding aluminum. Pretty much what you see on the material your welding will end up in your weld so if you want nice welds start off with nice clean metal.  Flap wheels and acetone work great for this purpose as well as brushes. Just remember never to use carbon brushes on stainless or aluminum (stainless steel brushes for those) and never use a brush or wheel for multiple metals. If you use a stainless brush for stainless write on it so you remember what it's for.  Mixing things will cross contaminate your material.  When your welding hot rolled steel always take the mill-scale completely off. Mil Scale causes the weld to undercut and all the crap contaminates the puddle. 

2) Tungsten, there are a few ways to prepare your tungsten but the most common and cost effective way is to use a dedicated wheel on a bench grinder, just remember what ever you use is for tungsten only or you will cross contaminate the tungsten.  As for what kind to buy I generally use 2% Thoriated (red) for everything except aluminum. Some people are scared of the fact that it is radioactive but there are many choices available to you so try some and find something you like. For aluminum I have had good results with 1.5% Lanthinated. The thorated tungsten tends to split on the end and produce thorium spikes when AC welding.  Remember that using Pure Tungsten (green) is a thing of the past!  I has the worst characteristics of all the tungsten electrodes, Junk! lol

3) Polarity, most of your welding will be done using Direct Current Electrode Negative, or Reverse polarity. This concentrates 2/3 of the heat on the work and only 1/3 of the heat in the electrode. Thus saving the tungsten from melting and providing good penetration. It is possible to weld with Direct Current Electrode Positive or straight polarity but 2/3 of the heat is concentrated in the electrode and only 1/3 is on the work. You would need an excessively large tungsten size at very little amperage to keep the tungsten alive and that produces very bad arc starting. Alternating Current is used to weld Aluminum and Magnesium. Theoretically you could weld steel with ac but it is not recommended. Alternating current has two components. Balance and frequency(hz). It's obvious that the current cycles between DCEP and DCEN but also the rate at which it does plays an important role.

4) Tig welding machines. There are generally two types of tig welding machines Inverters (new) and transformers (old).  Inverters pretty much use electronics to run and are much smaller in size. They consume less electricity and have alot more features.  The Dynasty for example has the ability to run off a regular 110v house outlet or a massive 440v 3 phase outlet all with a change of the plug. The machine recalibrates itself automatically. Transformers lack some of the features that the newer machines have and are much larger in size, and consume more power. For example the Syncrowave 200 pulls 50amp form the wall while the Dynasty 200 pulls 30. That being said both have pros and cons and both are very capable of producing nice, quality welds.

5) Welding common metals. Pretty much with most car stuff your going to weld some common metals like Mild Steel, Stainless Steel, Chromoly Steel and Aluminum. It you happen to need to weld something not so common like Titianium, Nickel, whatever just research it to find out what you need. When it comes to welding mild steel just make sure it is clean and a good common filler rod is ER-70s-2. Remember to take of mill scale on hot rolled.  With Stainless steel shielding gas and heat control are more critical. Common fillers to use are 308l, and 316l and when welding stainless steel to a dissimilar metal use 309l as it is loaded with more de-oxidizers. Chromoly as far as car stuff goes use mild-steel filler ER-70s-2,6 or ER-80D-2.  Usually you will always want to match your filler metal with your base metal but in the case of chromoly you can't use chromoly rod without heat-treating the metal afterward and this doesn't mean crank out the acetylene and do a half-ass job, proper heat-treating is big bucks and beyond the scope of most car people. Mild steel filler works fine on chromoly tubing and adds some ductility to the metal.

6) Aluminum welding!  I love talking about welding aluminum because there is just so many things to adjust and play with. This is the reason I bought my Dynasty was because of all the features it has to weld aluminum. Always weld with alternating current. When the waveform is in the Negative portion of the cycle you are penetrating and when the waveform is in the positive portion it is (cleaning) Electrode positive is what helps break up oxides on the surface of the metal and is why you see the etched zone on the sides of the welds when welding aluminum. In the olden days lol you use to ball the end of the tungsten to help it withstand the additional heat that the EP provides. A pointed tip would quickly deteriorate. This is the reason for using pure green tungsten as it melts easily.  This is junk because you always want to have a pointed tip to concentrate the arc. This is where the balance setting on the machine comes into play.  The balance is used to adjust the amount of electrode negative or positive you have in the AC cycle.  When using a Dynasty you can go from 30% to 99% Electrode Negative.  The higher percentages of electrode negative allow the welder to use a pointed tip to weld on aluminum hence eliminating the green tungsten balling technique.  Just remember the higher you set the balance the greater amount of Electrode negative you are getting, the lower you set the balance the more electrode positive you are getting. More EP- more heat in the tungsten and more (cleaning) action in the weld, you'll notice a larger etched zone (white line on the sides of the weld) the more EP you add. Older transformer machines have a fixed frequency of 60hz as that is what comes off the wall. Newer inverter machines have the ability to adjust the frequency (amount of times the current cycles in one second is the frequency) Increasing the frequency concentrates the arc and provides deeper penetration.  Basically you have more control over the puddle and can subsequently can produce smaller tighter beads with an increased frequency. The Dyansty200 has to ability to adjust from 20hz-250hz.  If you ever hear a machine welding on high frequency they are really loud and sould like chainsaws lol. Another thing to mention is the AC waveform.  It's easier to explain with pictures but old machines used to use a sine wave. The waveform is basically the shape of AC cycling. Newer machines switched to an Advanced Squarewave that basically produced different characteristics. Now with the Dynasty's and other inverters you have the ability to choose whit waveform you would like.  The Dynasty can do SineWave, TriangularWave, Soft-SquareWave, and Advanced SquareWave. All have there differences. Another thing to add is that Aluminum reacts with the atmosphere to form aluminum oxide on the surface of the metal, Aluminum oxide's melting point is above 3,000F while aluminum's melting point is roughly 1250F. When welding aluminum you need to remove the oxide layer, if you don't by the time you melt the aluminum oxide you will punch right through the metal because it's too hot. Use a stainless steel brush to to remove the oxide layer and don't use it for anything else to prevent cross contamination.

7) Pulse, I don't have anything to say about the pulse lol I bought my machine without it because I didn't feel the need to use it but i'm sure it has it place and applications.

Shielding Gas, With Tig you will use 100% Argon for 99.9% of all the welding you do. When Tig was first started it was called Heli-Arc because helium was the primary shielding gas used.  Helium is lighter than air forcing you to use increased flow rates and doesn't ionize as easily as argon does.  What this means is that helium burns much hotter and is used to help with penetration on aluminum.  Argon is an excellent choice for Tig because it is heavier than air thus it easily shields the weld from the atmosphere and lower flow rates can be used.  Also Argon and Helium are Inert gases (they don't combine chemically with other materials) so they don't contaminate the weld.  I usually run around 15cfh for argon but your flow rates will vary depending on the conditions your welding in.  For example if your welding outside you might increase the flow rates to keep the weld properly shielded.

Disclaimer I don't claim to be an expert an anyway shape or form, feel free to correct me if you feel my information is wrong. Please forgive the typos lol I'm also biased toward the Dynasty's because I own one there are many other choices of good welders to choose from. This is just some basic info. feel free to ask me anything specific I'll do my best to answer any questions, Thanks Ryan.
« Last Edit: March 10, 2011, 01:42:12 AM by FabChild »
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Offline Pez

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Offline LNF_AJ

Re: Welding tips...
« Reply #23 on: March 07, 2011, 11:18:21 PM »
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Us7VDZT-NcQ&feature=player_embedded#at=89

Haha at the video editing when "he" started to spot weld it he had no gloves on.  Then right after he magically had his gloves on.  I also love his "mask"

Offline FabChild

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Re: Welding tips...
« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2011, 02:36:49 AM »
I'm jealous that dude has a drill press lol
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