July 12, 2020, 05:40:35 PM

Author Topic: "Doda" '93 FD NASA TT Build  (Read 9339 times)

Offline PeakAlpha

Re: "Doda" '93 FD NASA TT Build
« Reply #45 on: August 13, 2019, 11:20:53 PM »
As a ďquickĒ aside, this whole experience really taught me what building a project car is all about.

*pulls up soap box*

*AHEM!!*

For everybody out there who is either currently building a project car, or has the desire to build a project car; you have to BUST YOUR ASS!!! Thatís what it ultimately comes down to. I know that for me there were many times where I would be working seemingly an infinite number of consecutive weekends on some pain in the ass project (wiring, *cough*) and it just seemed like I would NEVER get the stupid thing done. And then you run into mechanical problems, and oil leaks, and a million shitty little things that suck to deal with, and all the while your project car is just sitting in the garage. It can be very discouraging. But that last summer I just finally got tired of nothing ever getting done, so I decided to BUST MY ASS and just work through all of the bullshit RELENTLESSLY. And ultimately, it really worked out. Some people are better mechanics than I am, so maybe itís easier for them, but at some point I think everybody just has to learn the hard way through trial-and-error, and not being intimidated about replacing that cam shaft or whatever. I know I have had QUITE my fair share of screw-ups, and getting something together only to realize that it had to come right back apart. It sucks. But it ultimately taught me some valuable things, and it ultimately allows me to drive the PISS out of my racecar which I built myself. And it all started in my shitty falling-down garage in Blowhio. But I am proud as Hell. And every time I pass the SHIT out of a fancy BMW or whatever on the track, itís just another smile on my face and a reminder that it was worth all of the long hours in the garage, and the apoplectic temper tantrums over something that I had fucked up on the car, and not hanging out with friends at the bar because I had to get a little further on the wiring, and all of the trade-offs that had to be made. If you set a goal and RUTHLESSLY pursue it all the way to the bottom, it WILL ultimately be worth it guys. Never lose the faith Pistards.

Offline digitalsolo

  • Administrator
  • Top Fuel
  • Location: Fort Wayne, IN
  • Posts: 23101
  • View Gallery
    • View Profile
    • LS1FC.com
Re: "Doda" '93 FD NASA TT Build
« Reply #46 on: August 14, 2019, 03:36:02 PM »
That's a pretty concise explanation of building these things.  :D
Blake MF'ing McBride
1988 Mazda RX7 - Turbo LS1/T56/ProEFI/8.8/Not Slow...   sold.
1965 Mustang Coupe - TT Coyote, TR6060, modern brakes/suspension...  project car
2016 BMW 428i xDrive Gran Coupe - Completely stock...ish

Offline freeskier7791

Re: "Doda" '93 FD NASA TT Build
« Reply #47 on: August 16, 2019, 12:14:20 PM »
That's a pretty concise explanation of building these things.  :D

I'd say so, it took me 2 engines and 6 years to make my car reliable enough to drive around, and it still vibrates like crazy above 70mph
https://www.youtube.com/thedriftingdad
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL Drift Car

CCVT

Offline PeakAlpha

Re: "Doda" '93 FD NASA TT Build
« Reply #48 on: August 18, 2019, 11:32:23 PM »
Aaaaalllllllrightyyyy, so after the semi-disaster that was Buttonwillow, I dragged my sorry ass all the way back to AZ and went to sleep. Let the car sit for a couple of days to take a break and then I got to work. I had about a month to figure my shit out. The first thing I did was figure out my brakes. Turns out there wasnít anything catastrophically wrong with them. I ended up purchasing an easy-bleeder that uses tire pressure to push fluid through the system from the master cylinder reservoir. Once I put that on there the system cleared whatever was pluggin it up on the left rear caliper. So I got the brakes bled no problem and then turned my attention to the shifting issues.

The transmission seemed to do really well for the first couple of laps of each session (especially the first session), but then it got pretty notchy after several hard laps. This being the case, my best guess was that the issue was most likely related to heat. Looking at my setup, I noticed that the headers run pretty close to the transmission and clutch line. So I did what any ricer would do and bought some header wrap. Believe me, I donít think that the header wrap was going to add 50 HP or anything, I just wanted to dump the heat out of the exhaust tip instead of pouring it into my transmission. Gotta say, I actually am decently proud, I think I did a good job. But SON OF A FIREMANíS DICK is fiberglass a pain to deal with. I literally sacrificed a pair of jeans just to get this shit done (extreme white girl problems, I know). What I ended up doing was getting a 5 gallon bucket, and soaking the wrap before I put it on the header. This helped to make it easier to work with since it was more flexible/stretchy when wet (just like my bepis!). Then, I started the wrap and secured the lead end in place with a stainless-steel zip tie. I tightened the zip tie with a needle dick pliers and then continued wrapping, laying the wrap over itself so that I covered 1/2-2/3 of the previous wrap with each successive wrap. Results are in the picture below. Oh, and finish it off with some SS zip ties as well to keep her all in place. Once the shit dries, it tends to shrink just a bit and hold more tightly to the header. Ended up using two different brands of wrap since I ran out of parts store wrap and then purchased some cheaper shit online. Hence the two-tone look to it. Both headers look about the same since I split the wrap I had between them.



Another thing that I did at some point was to put a new clutch master cylinder in my pedal box. I originally had the stock size ĺĒ master in there. During my research about shifting issues on a T56, I had read that the stock size did not push enough fluid to fully disengage the clutch at high RPM, and that people were switching to a larger MC to solve this. I already had a pedal box, so I said F it and bought a 7/8Ē MC. Problem was, I didnít want to over-travel the clutch if I could avoid it. So to help that problem, I had one of my welder bros at work weld a reinforcement plate on either side of my Clutch pedal (it is an I-beam shape), and then drill/tap a hole for a 3/8Ē bolt. The bolt runs through the pedal and the head of the bolt acts as a stop to limit the clutch movement. Didnít get any pictures of this at the time. Itís a simple solution, but it works.

So, at some point my next track day finally came around. This one was down at Bondurant School Main Track in November 2018. Clearly I am friggen hooked at this point. Spending all of my time building stupid race cars. I actually gave up playing guitar to make more time for my stupid car. NO RAGRETS! (not even one letter). It is paying off big time now! Getting ďstokedĒ to go down to Phoenix and hit the track again! EFF YEAHH!!!

So the big day finally arrived. I did it wrong this time and ended up driving down Friday night. To be honest, I had a pretty damn stressful week at work, so I was desperately tired as it was. Then, when I was loading up the car on Friday night, I was having some issues with the clutch not wanting to release all the way. Stupid new clutch cylinder didnít seem to want to cooperate DAMMIT!!! But, I got it on the trailer and then moved my adjustment screw to give myself a little more travel. But I was in such a fkn rush, I didnít have time to test it so I didnít know if it helped, or if my gearbox was just wrecked from my few track days of potentially overheating. Oh well, SEND IT I guess. Got on the road and at some point I actually almost just pulled the plug on the whole operation because I was so discouraged. My shitty disasterful weekend at Buttonwillow the last time out wasnít helping my attitude. But at this point I was already like an hour down the road so I figured I was pretty well committed. Got to the parking lot at the entrance of the track and set up the inflatable bed to lay down for the night. The track was in the damn middle of Phoenix, so pretty noisy and whatnot, and the night security dickweeds for the event were ripping around on a FUCKING MINI-BIKE until like midnight. So that was horse piss. Man, what a great night. Hope tomorrow goes better.

Woke up bright and early, pulled the car out of the trailer and sucked down some granola bars for breakfast. Got over to tech and got it out of the way. The trans seemed to be shifting better with the pedal adjustment, so I was thankful for that. Day was looking up already. Went to my morning HPDE2 meeting. One of the instructors explained that he would be leading a couple of slow-ish laps at the beginning of session1 to show us all the line and whatnot. This works better in theory than in practice unless you are directly behind the instructor because the clowns following get WAY off line, and then everybody following them just ends up really fucking confused as to what the Hell is happening. Itís like playing telephone as a kid, and the original phrase is something like ďI wanna bake a pizzaĒ, and by the end it becomes ďCharlieís Mom is a mentally challenged potatoĒ. Never works out right. But after a few laps, I got a point by and FLEW into turn 1!!!



Aaaaannd right through it as it turns out. I ended up WAY too far on the inside of the turn and didnít have enough tire to hack the corner. Ended up sliding right through an early apex and into the dirt heading straight for the tire barrier. I was still on the brakes at this point and the car spun around and stopped before hitting the barrier (PHEW!!!), and then my cabin filled with smoke, FACK!!!!! So, I quickly undid my seat belt and popped out of the car and ran to the tire barrier so I was somewhat out of the way. The fire extinguisher bros showed up and had me pop the hood since we couldnít see any flames. Popped her, and a bunch of smoke poured out, but no fire. The issue ended up being a leaking valve cover. Between Buttonwillow and Bondurant, I had installed a catch can to avoid oil pissing all over the under side of my hood through the stupid cheesy breather cap. Well, one of my valve covers had a vent tube, but the other one didnít so I had the aforementioned welder bro weld a little nozzle onto my left side valve cover so that I could put a tube on it and run it to the catch can. When he welded it, the cover must have warped because Aluminum, and the gasket wasnít sealing quite right against the head. But, it was just smoking, so they let me drive slowly back to the pits. I got to work right away and popped the valve cover off. I cleaned it up as best I could and re-seated the valve cover just to see if it would work. It seemed to be okay actually. I took and ran a couple of circles at the back of the paddock to be sure, and the oil appeared to have mostly stopped leaking.

After the spin I was a little bit shaken. My first major screw-up on track, followed by a smoke-filled cockpit was admittedly a bit nerve-wracking for me. But, no time to feel sorry for myself, so I headed out for my second session. Second session went well, and my damn valve cover had stopped leaking. I started to get a bit faster this session, but mostly I started to feel comfortable with my car. Bondurant was a bit bumpy, and I was really noticing that my chassis was a bit twitchy. After my second session, I noticed that a bunch of fluid was leaking on my control arms. Eventually once I got home I tracked this down to the damper. I was still using stock dampers believe it or not. Donít ask how that happenedÖ

Third session went really well also and I was able to find some clear-ish track and put down a decent lap or two. From the video it looks like I was doing in the neighborhood of 55s per lap. Not terrible. The SUPER fast dudes in the race groups were down in the high 40ís if I remember right. So still off by a bit, but not too awful for stock size tires and shot-ass dampers.

The fourth and final session of the day is always my favorite. Half of the people take off early and donít even participate, so there is always a bunch of free track. The session went really well, except that I almost pooped my pants on the front straight when I started to lose the rear and had to counter-steer all over the place (video below). WEEEW!!! That was a close one. But, I somehow survived with poopless shorts.

After my last session, one of the instructors came up to talk to me and ordered me to check ride into HPDE3. I tried to find an instructor before the last session, but it was too late. Oh well, next time I guess. Had a GREAT track day, car worked fine, and shifting issues were MUCH better with the heat wrap and the extra clutch throw. Crazy how much of a difference that heat wrap made. Seemed to keep everything much more under control with the trans temp. Still not monitoring trans temps at this point, but the shifting was much improved. So at the end of the day I packed up and went home. I could have stayed over and ran on Sunday, but I was beat and wanted to get some damn sleep. The track was pretty small and whatnot too, so not as much fun as, say, Buttonwillow. But still sort of a neat little technical track. Some pics from the day.


Sunrise... And no, this doesn't have any "filters" on it. The morning was just that damn beautiful. And the pic turned out for whatever reason.


Rotate my tires you lazy PRICK!!!



Mmm, yeah!!! Glamor shots!!


SUCK MY HORN MIATAS AHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!


And of course, I was over the damn moon that the instructors told me I could move up to DE3. That was a nice cherry on my dong for the next track day. All in all an insanely successful track day after a rocky start. Just goes to show that it is always ALWAYS better to stop being such a whiney bitch and just go RAYSKARR!!!! SO glad that I didnít give up and go back home. What a day. Enjoy the short video everyone!!! Have a great night!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-HNKLFj2NI&feature=youtu.be

Offline digitalsolo

  • Administrator
  • Top Fuel
  • Location: Fort Wayne, IN
  • Posts: 23101
  • View Gallery
    • View Profile
    • LS1FC.com
Re: "Doda" '93 FD NASA TT Build
« Reply #49 on: August 19, 2019, 12:32:33 PM »
Sounds like a pretty successful overall day!
Blake MF'ing McBride
1988 Mazda RX7 - Turbo LS1/T56/ProEFI/8.8/Not Slow...   sold.
1965 Mustang Coupe - TT Coyote, TR6060, modern brakes/suspension...  project car
2016 BMW 428i xDrive Gran Coupe - Completely stock...ish

Offline PeakAlpha

Re: "Doda" '93 FD NASA TT Build
« Reply #50 on: August 19, 2019, 09:32:51 PM »
Sounds like a pretty successful overall day!

Heck yeah mang!!! This was the first track day that I felt comfortable actually pushing the car since everything was working well. So pretty exciting because I could actually put in some hard laps without worrying about the stupid car!! 'twas a blast.

Offline PeakAlpha

Re: "Doda" '93 FD NASA TT Build
« Reply #51 on: December 10, 2019, 10:54:23 PM »
Hey guys! I know it has been a while, so I figured I should get my lazy ass in gear and write another installment. After my day in Bondurant in January I had a solid 5 weeks or so off. The next event that I participated in was up at Las Vegas Motor Speedway in January. This event was with SCCA instead of NASA like usual, and it was with a local sub-chapter that mostly does autocross. This was actually their first track day ever as an organization. So kinda neat. Itís kind of a shame that they donít do these more often, because it is the closest track to me.

The LVMS complex is actually pretty awesome. There are 3 road tracks up there, and of course the YUGE NASCAR oval. Two of the road tracks actually get used for Exotic Car Racing Experience things or whatever. They seem like a cool deal, but I already own my own race car so I have never done it. But if your Dad is having a mid-life crisis, it would be a great gift!! Fly out to Vegas, snort cocaine off of a prostituteís dong, go drive a Ferrari! Dream vacation. AnywaysÖ

Seeing as how the track was so close, I got to sleep in until 5 and then head up to the track. Got up there at 6:30 or so. Ended up being a partly cloudy day. It was a chilly high of 50 degrees or so (downright frigid for the Desert). Had never been to this track before so I was looking forward to it.

The morning meeting was fine, and then we split up into our various run groups. I ended up signing up for the second experience group out of four. I didnít want to be over-confident after my NASA experiences. This ended up being a bit of a mistake, as I got trapped behind lots of traffic at times  :barf: , but live and learn homies. At least I wasnít the dickweed holding everybody else up.







Once I got on track, I learned a few things. First off, my car was still running a little warm, but not terribly so; got up to 230-235 by the end of the 2nd session. Not the end of the world, but still warmer than Iíd like. For this particular track day, I actually tried making a simple shroud for the front of the car to try and encourage airflow to flow through the radiator instead of spilling around it. It really didnít seem to make a positive difference, which I confirmed after I took it off for the 4th session and it made absolutely no difference in the water temps. At this point I was pretty convinced that my cooling problem was most likely related to the back side of my radiator (my fan/shroud). More on that laterÖ

From a driving standpoint, this track was a bit of a step up from Bondurant the week before. Much higher speeds on the straights, and much bigger braking zones as a result. T1 was particularly daunting, as there was quite a lot of slowing down to do. I definitely didnít get on the brakes hard enough here, which I realized when watching my videos post-event. Really exposed a major weakness for my driving, and gave me something to work on in the future.

There was also a turn on the back straight that I am pretty sure I was going way too slow around. It was a high-speed right-hander that intimidated the Hell out of me. Every time I got to that turn, I slowed way down for it. I am pretty sure that this is just something that will come with experience. At this point I am convinced that 50% of getting faster is just growing a pair of dicks and getting more comfortable with throwing the car through some high-speed sections. The other 50% I would say is learning how to trail-brake properly and transition the car from pedal to pedal deep into the corner. But for now, I was not quite there. As you can see from the video, there is plenty of time left on the table for me and this car. Hopefully I can get the hang of things as I learn and progress. But for now, I was just having fun and enjoying the fact that my race car was working reliably and I was able to drive it as it should be driven!!



Offline PeakAlpha

Re: "Doda" '93 FD NASA TT Build
« Reply #52 on: December 26, 2019, 10:26:46 PM »
Hey Pistards!!

So, I mentioned in my last post that I was still having some problems with heat. Since this is purely a track car, that problem was going to have to be fixed. I had already tried adding as big a fan as I could get my hands on, but it didnít seem to make much of a difference. So, before I headed out to Chuckwalla Valley Raceway in February, I decided to try a couple of other things. First, I built a new sturdier shroud to mount on the front of the radiator. This should theoretically reduce the drag of the radiator (slightly) from hanging it out in the wind below the front of the car, and encourage all the air coming in through the front of the rad to actually pass through the radiator. I made sure to make it higher quality this time than the one I had made for LVMS.





I also decided to do away with the fan shroud on the back side of my radiator. Since the front shroud by itself didnít seem to do shit for me at LVMS, my theory was that maybe the fan shroud was simply restricting the exit air flow from the radiator. The reason that the fan shroud exists at all is to help the fans draw air evenly through the entire radiator face when the car is stopped. In fact, the fans should only really be necessary to cool the car when it is in stop/go traffic or stopped on the tarmac. Even so, I ended up using a couple of pieces of square AL tubing to mount the fan on the back side of the radiator. Just for the tits of it, I tested it in my garage to make sure that turning the fan on still brought the water temp back down, which it did. Mission accomplished, got rid of the stupid fan shroud.

Another thing that I wanted to do before Chuckie-Chuckie-Wa-Wa was check my alignment and re-set it for more camber. My RE-71Rís seemed to be wearing quite a lot on the outside shoulder when the camber was set at -2.2 degrees or so. So, I busted out the string box and my homemade toe plates and got to work. Doing the alignment without a rack is a pain in the chinchilla hole, but I grew a pair of dicks and got Ďer done. Ended up setting the camber for -3.0 deg front, and -2.7 deg rear. Seems like a lot, but I was hoping to avoid cording the outside shoulder and make my tires last.




Anywho, on Friday night I loaded up the truck and trailer and got everything ready for the following day. Chuckles is close enough to my house that I ended up being able to leave at a reasonable time on Saturday morning and just sleep in my own bed Friday night. So, I got up nice and early and loaded my tired-ass puppies and wife into the truck and headed out before Sunrise. It was a fairly easy/uneventful drive with no traffic, and I pulled into the track around 0600, with plenty of time to offload the car and get through tech. The morning was sunny, cool, and beautiful. Couldnít ask for better weather. I am liking this whole ďwinterĒ thing in the desert.





I was going to pick up where I had left off at Bondo in December, so I was still in HPDE 2 for the moment. I decided to take the first session to just get used to the track and take some easy laps and re-familiarize myself with the car. As usual I ended up stuck in traffic, but the car felt good and I got a chance to build some confidence. I also was shocked and pleased to see that my water temperature never got above 175 F. I was still not pushing the car hard, the ambient temps were cool, and it was the first session of the day (oil was still not awfully warm), but this at least bode well for the state of my cooling modifications.



Right after the end of session 1, I approached the instructor who was leading my group and requested a check ride into HPDE3. He agreed, and got me set up for a ride along for the 2nd session. AndÖ



Mission accomplished, I moved up to DE3 with no problems!

Session 3 was a blast, but I still was driving relatively conservatively as the last thing that I wanted to do was to hold up the DE3 drivers, or over-drive the car and go off track. My goal was just to have a clean session, and get used to the new passing rules, which allowed people (including me) to pass in the turns. This was a very new concept coming from DE2 (only passing on the straights), but I did fine and didnít endanger anybody. Key is to simply keep paying attention to the cars around you and have common sense/courtesy. I actually caught a video (below) from this session before my damn GoPro died halfway through session 4. Like I said, I was taking it a bit easy, but still improving since LVMS. I was still a bit hesitant on the brakes, and not trail braking deep enough, but getting better all the time.



So, for the final session of the day, I got to go out right about the last session when the sun was setting behind the mountains. It was a seriously beautiful session, with ambient temps around 70 F, and clear skies turning to orange as the sun went down. What a Helluva day. Moved up to DE3 like a boss, and got to drive one of the most beautiful tracks in the West. What could be better?

My last session had gone really well, and I got some open track and time to test out the cooling for reals. My water temp never got above 195 F!!! I had finally solved the damn cooling problem! Thank goodness!! In fact, my radiator fan never even turned on throughout the entire weekend. Turns out the damn thing is completely unnecessary (at least for the conditions that day), which makes some sense. The air flow from the air shooting into the front of the car at 100 mph should be much more significant than anything the dinky rad fan can provide. It wasnít all smooth sailing though; on the back straight, I went to pass a miata and up-shifted from 3rd to 4th. Right after I shifted, I lost all power and felt my stomach drop through my pooper. What the EFF is happening? So, I pointed some people by and found a safe place to pull off the track on the right-hand side. I parked and started trying to re-start to no avail. Then, I suddenly noticed that my key for my cutoff switch was nowhere to be found! What the piss? I started frantically looking around the cockpit and out of the corner of my eye, I saw the little red bitch sitting between the driverís seat and the trans tunnel. I reached down (YOW that fucker is hot!!), and somehow managed to grab it without burning my finger tits off. Slammed the key back in, gave her some power and BAM!!!

The car started totally normally and everything was perfectly fine. Relief washed over me like so much urine passing over a Russian prostitute. The car was okay!! Hail Santa!!! So, I made sure nobody was coming over my left shoulder, and pulled back onto the track. By this point, the session was more or less over, so I took it easy on my way into the pits. What a great day. The sunset was absolutely stunning that evening, and I got to drink beer and eat Tacos with my Automotive family way out there in the middle of the desert. What a great group of guys.





The next morning, I woke up and ate breakfast like a mortal, and rotated the tires front-to-rear. The rears tend to take more wear than the fronts, so I typically do this every 4 sessions or so. Morning meeting was normal with no surprises. The track configuration was reversed for day 2, so we would be running CCW this time. The first session, I took it easy again (cold tires, cold brain) and got to know the new configuration. No surprises, just some different reference points, etcÖ Second session I started to push it a little more and was becoming quite comfortable with the car by the end of it.

Right after lunch, there was actually a special session where all of the spouses/significant others of the racers got to drive the car. So, we got my wife a helmet, and strapped her ass into the olí drift missile.



They even let me be her instructor, so I ran her through some simple safety things and we got going. I love my wife a lot, but she was the slowest driver on track by a lot. Made me giggle. But the important thing was that she was safe and didnít get in anybodyís way, so all-in-all it was a huge success. And she enjoyed the shit out of it!

I decided to have my wife ride along for the 3rd session so that she could get a sense of how fast the car could really go in the turns. I enjoyed getting to show her what it was all about, and she enjoyed the ride-along greatly. The session ended safely and fun-ly (or something).

The fourth and final session I went out alone and had a friggen blast!!! The only thing I did notice towards the end of the session was that I was seeing some voltage fluctuations. Uh-ohÖ I put in a cool-down lap and pulled her into the pits since the session was over anyways. The fluctuations turned out to be just a loose ground wire on my fuse box, which was easily and immediately fixed.

So, we packed up the tools and loaded Doda onto the back of the trailer and rounded up tired puppies. Good-bye Chuckwalla!





Seriously one of the best track weekends I have ever had. Everything worked great with the car, I moved up to a faster run group, the weather was perfect, and the track was absolutely awesome. If you guys ever get a chance to run Chuckwalla, do it. It is great. Tons of medium-speed sweepers, a couple of technical sections, some elevation change thrown in for good measure, and a badass banked sweeper on the back side that is totally teats. Until next time!!!



Offline Cobranut

Re: "Doda" '93 FD NASA TT Build
« Reply #53 on: December 26, 2019, 11:28:47 PM »
Thanks for the update Alpha.
Looks like you're having a blast with the car, and it's so cool that your wife can enjoy it with you.  8)

I always get a kick out of your writing style too. LOL
1995 FD, 7.0 Liter stroked LS3, T56, 8.8, Samberg kit.

Offline PeakAlpha

Re: "Doda" '93 FD NASA TT Build
« Reply #54 on: December 29, 2019, 08:28:30 PM »
Thanks for the update Alpha.
Looks like you're having a blast with the car, and it's so cool that your wife can enjoy it with you.  8)

I always get a kick out of your writing style too. LOL

Thanks Mustang Cobra Nuts. I appreciate it. I love you.

But for reals, glad y'all are enjoying it. I actually haven't been out to the track for a good long while. Been figuring out how to get a new transmission so I have been working on that. Big things coming for the race car...

Offline gnx7

Re: "Doda" '93 FD NASA TT Build
« Reply #55 on: March 30, 2020, 12:46:05 PM »
Proper ducting of the radiator is key.... plus getting all the air out of the system (coolant vacuum works wonders).

Are you going with a dog box or sticking with a 6 speed manual?
'93 FD: 441ci/AllPro LS7 heads/intake en route, T56 Mag, 8.8" IRS, HolleyHP, DavisTechTC 10.32@137mph cats/full exhaust. 165mph 1/2 mile (old LS7)
'93 FD LS9 turbo, T56 Mag, Samberg 8.8" solid axle, 9.35@163mph 197mph 1/2 mile
`69 Chevelle: alum 5.3, GTS76 turbo, ChiseledPerf A/W, T56 Magnum,Ford 35 spline 9".CTS-V interior http://www.norotors.com/index.php?topic=18234.0
old yellar....440rwhp/FD sold but not forgotten: http://www.ponycars.net/scc.htm
I sell new T56 Magnums/McLeod clutch/T56 rebuild kits/Holley EFI/FIC injectors and all BrianTooleyRacing parts.  norcalmotorsport@gmail.com